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Original Artwork for Led Zeppelin’s Debut Album Headed to Auction

The original artwork on the cover of Led Zeppelin's 1969 self-titled debut album will be auctioned off via Christie's during a sale scheduled for June 2nd through 18th.

The cover was designed by George Hardie and based on photographer Sam Shere's famous 1937 photograph of the Hindenburg disaster. It's estimated to fetch between $20,000 to $30,000, and Christie's senior specialist of Books and Manuscripts, Peter Klarnet, tells Rolling Stone, "In terms of rarity, this is a unique object - I don't think you can get rarer than that."

Hardie designed the piece while he was a graduate student at the Royal College of Art in London after his friend, the photographer Stephen Goldblatt, had recommended him to Zeppelin. After rejecting Hardie's first few cover ideas, guitarist Jimmy Page suggested he do something with Shere's Hindenburg picture. For his take on the photo, Hardie used tracing paper to recreate the image in stipple - a style of drawing using small dots - to give it the same feel as a low-resolution newspaper photo.

Read the full story at: https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/led-zeppelin-album-original-cover-art-george-hardie-auction-995569/

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This Month in
Led Zeppelin History

July xx, 1969 - The band play many festivals now on their third American tour
July xx, 1970 - Additional recording for Led Zeppelin III at London’s Island Studios
July 16, 1970 - Photographer Chris Welch films Led Zeppelin on his 8mm camera, some clips later used in the Whole Lotta Love promo video
July xx, 1971 - Untitled gets re-mixed in London
July 05, 1971 - A riot erupts mid-concert, forcing Led Zeppelin to stop after about 40 minutes
July xx, 1972 - After repeated bad press, Led Zeppelin hire their first publicity firm
July 20, 1973 - A last minute decision is made to film the remaining part of the tour
July xx, 1973 - Led Zeppelin is filmed over the three nights for their film that will emerge as The Song Remains The Same
July xx, 1974 - After viewing their 1973 filmed performance, it is apparent critical errors were made
July xx, 1974 - Mixing for Physical Graffiti at Olympic Studios
July 05, 1975 - The band meet in Montreux to discuss adding South America and Japan to the end of their North American tour
July xx, 1976 - Bonham and Page fly to Montreux, Switzerland to check out some new sound and drum effects
July 17, 1977 - The last ever performance of Moby Dick played at the Seattle Kingdome
July 24, 1977 - The band plays its last US date at the Oakland Coliseum
July xx, 1978 - Led Zeppelin are invited to perform at Maggie Bell’s Festival Hall show
July xx, 1979 - Led Zeppelin film their rehearsal at Bray Studios
July 04, 1979 - Led Zeppelin confirm a second date at Knebworth in August 1979
July 05, 1980 - Simon Kirke joins in on drums for an encore in Munich
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