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Death Wish II: The Original Soundtrack (2011) More Info

Death Wish II: The Original Soundtrack (2011) More Info

Death Wish II: The Original Soundtrack (2011) Album Covers

Death Wish II: The Original Soundtrack (2011) Album Covers

Death Wish II: The Original Soundtrack (2011)

Death Wish II: The Original Soundtrack (2011)

Coverdale • Page More Info

Coverdale • Page More Info

Coverdale • Page Album Covers

Coverdale • Page Album Covers

Coverdale • Page

Coverdale • Page

Outrider More Info

Outrider More Info

Outrider Album Covers

Outrider Album Covers

Outrider

Outrider

Mean Business More Info

Mean Business More Info

Mean Business Album Covers

Mean Business Album Covers

Mean Business

Mean Business
[Click above for album images]



This album is a driving, pounding sound delivery and more studio laid out than previous Rogers orchestrations. There is less of past English blues that Rogers brought to Free and more fast paced rock than bad Company would follow with. With Mean Business' The Firm showcases the some of the vast range of Paul Rogers' vocals. Jimmy Page's standard strong guitar explodes around the bass riffs of as is the case. I like it. If you listen to Bad Company, The Law or Queen you will know Rogers is the most accomplished Vocal Rock voice in the decades he first showed up on the British scene in the late 60s. Jimmy Page's guitar is some of the best played during the last 40 years. Both from supergroups of their making are the standard all others try to rise to.

https://www.amazon.com/Mean-Business-FIRM/dp/B000002IIV

It's not as cohesive as their debut and the songwriting isn't quite as strong, but the musicianship is unsurprisingly great and Rodgers' voice is as powerful as it's ever been. The strongest tracks are "Live In Peace" (which was originally featured on Rodgers' debut solo album), album opener "Fortune Hunter" (which was based on a riff Page first attempted in 1981 for the aborted XYZ project with the Yes rhythm section of Chris Squire & Alan White), the #1 Mainstream Rock hit "All The Kings Horses" and the gospel-flavored "Spirit Of Love."

https://kamertunesblog.wordpress.com/2016/01/07/thirty-year-thursday-introduction-the-firm-mean-business/
Statistics

Released:
Feb. 3, 1986

Chart Position:
#22 (US) #46 (UK)

Certified:


Tracks

1. Fortune Hunter
2. Cadillac
3. Allthe King's Horses
4. Live in Peace
5. Tear Down the Walls
6. Dreaming
7. Free to Live
8. Spirit of Love
Quick Fact

The album's title was intended to have a double meaning: that the music business is a hard one, and that the band was serious about its music ('The Firm mean business'). [Citizendium]

The Firm More Info

The Firm THE FIRM
Atlantic 61239-2 (U.S.) / Atlantic 781 239-1 (U.K.)
Jimmy Page: Electric Guitar
Paul Rodgers: Lead Vocals, Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar
Tony Franklin: Bass Guitar, Backing Vocals, Synthesizer
Chris Slade: Drums, Percussion
Paul Weimar: Baritone Saxophone on Closer
Don Weller: Tenor Saxophone solo on Closer
Willie Garnett: Tenor Saxophone on Closer
Helen Chappelle: Backing Vocals on You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling
Joy Yates: Backing Vocals on You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling
Sam Brown: Backing Vocals on You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling

1. Closer 2:52 (Page/Rodgers)
2. Make or Break 4:21 (Rodgers)
3. Someone to Love 4:55 (Page/Rodgers)
4. Together 3:54 (Page/Rodgers)
5. Radioactive 2:49 (Rodgers)
6. You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling 4:33 (Phil Spector/Barry Mann/Cynthia Weil)
7. Money Can't Buy 3:35 (Rodgers)
8. Satisfaction Guaranteed 4:07 (Page/Rodgers)
9. Midnight Moonlight 9:13 (Page/Rodgers)

Stuart Epps: Engineer
Gordon Vicary: Mastering
Steve Maher: Cover Artwork
Steve Privett: Tape Operation, Supplier of tea, gin and tonics

Recorded and mixed at The Sol Studios, Cookham, Berkshire
Mastered at The Townhouse

The Firm

The Firm
[Click above for album images]



Anticipation was quite high when it was announced in 1984 that Paul Rodgers, the past voice of Bad Company, and Jimmy Page, Led Zeppelin's former guitarist, were creating a "supergroup" called the Firm. Page and Rodgers had first tinkered with the idea of an album after their successful collaboration on the ARMS benefit tour for Ronnie Lane in 1983. Based upon the fact that it had been over five years since Page's last band effort, and two years since Rodger's lackluster finale with the original Bad Company, pundits were more than eager to hear what new material the duo would unleash. However, when the band's self-titled debut was actually released in 1985, it received a critical drubbing and was all but ignored by the record-buying public. That's too bad, for the album is quite good and does nothing to taint the sterling reputations of either of its key players. Page and Rodgers were joined on The Firm by veteran drummer Chris Slade and Roy Harper-alum Tony Franklin. Slade's Bonham-esque sledgehammer attack on the skins, coupled with Franklin's fretless basslines, added dimension to Rodgers' smooth vocals and Page's layered guitar textures. Page's tone throughout is very reminiscent of the sound of his overdubs on Coda, as well as the sound he would subsequently employ on 1988's Outrider. Opening track "Closer" cleverly uses a subtle horn section to good effect, while "Someone to Love" represents all the good elements of the band in one number. Rodgers' "Radioactive" was actually a minor hit for the band, its quirkiness overcoming the goofiness of the lyrics. The album's best cut is "Satisfaction Guaranteed," a mid-tempo gem with a snaky and exotic Page riff and a heartfelt vocal performance by Rodgers. The only weak track on the record is the unnecessary cover of the Righteous Brothers' "You've Lost That Loving Feeling," which feels totally out of place. The album-closing "Midnight Moonlight" could have been the Firm's best song, but the underwhelming arrangement and superfluous backing vocals partially destroyed it. The fact that "Midnight Moonlight" was actually an unfinished Led Zeppelin cut entitled "Swansong," left over from the Physical Graffiti sessions, led some to believe that Page had run out of new ideas for the project. While it is true that this album isn't as uniformly excellent as Led Zeppelin's work, it is the best from this short-lived band and turned out to be Page's most consistent effort from the entire decade of the '80s.
-Brian Downing, AllMusic
Statistics

Released:
Feb. 11, 1985

Chart Position:
#17 (US) #15 (UK)

Certified:
Gold: Apr. 11, 1985

Tracks

1. Closer
2. Make or Break
3. Someone to Love
4. Together
5. Radioactive
6. You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling
7. Money Can't Buy
8. Satisfaction Guaranteed
9. Midnight Moonlight
Quick Fact

Jimmy Page first demoed the roots of Midnight Moonlight in mid-1973 at his home studio, complete with Mellotron accompaniment.

Whatever Happened to Jugula? More Info

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO JUGULA?
Beggars Banquet BEGA 60 / Science Friction HUCD032
Roy Harper: Acoustic guitar and/or electric guitar, vocals, percussion, producer
Jimmy Page: Acoustic guitar and/or electric guitar
Nick Harper: Semi-acoustic guitar
Tony Franklin: Bass guitar
Nik Green: Keyboards, Mixing desk
Ronnie Brambles: Drums
Steve Broughton: Drums
Preston Heyman: Drums
Michael Scott: Photography
Haunted Fox: Sleeve notes
Koala Bear: Sleeve notes, design, artwork

1. Nineteen Forty-Eightish 9:45 (Harper)
2. Bad Speech 1:17 (Harper)
3. Hope 4:31 (Harper/Gilmour)
4. Hangman 7:09 (Harper)
5. Elizabeth 6:39 (Harper)
6. Frozen Moment 3:18 (Harper)
7. Twentieth Century Man 4:27 (Harper)
8. Advertisement (Another Intentional Irrelevant Suicide) 8:19 (Harper)

Length: 45:25

Whatever Happened to Jugula?

Whatever Happened to Jugula?
[Click above for album images]



Idiosyncratic folk-rocker Roy Harper never became a household name in his native Britain, despite the efforts of high-profile backers including Pink Floyd's David Gilmour and Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page. The former has invited Harper to join him onstage many times over the years, and even asked him to sing lead on Floyd's "Have a Cigar," bringing his voice to millions of listeners who probably had no idea it wasn't Roger Waters. Page, for his part, lent his fretwork to several Harper albums, and named a Zeppelin ditty, "Hats Off to (Roy) Harper," in his honor.

Following several commercially soft albums (including an electric set with Zep's John Paul Jones and Yes/King Crimson sticksman Bill Bruford), Harper found himself in a rut. "There is no doubt in my own mind that the early '80s were the nadir of my life in music," he later said. To alleviate his creative malaise, he teamed up with his old pal Page for a series of folk festival appearances throughout 1984. Liberating for both men, the gigs ultimately led to a studio effort, Whatever Happened to Jugula?, which was released the following year.

At the time, Jugula fostered a renewed, if temporary, interest in Harper, whose '70s work rates among the most interesting, song-based music of the era. By giving Page equal billing, Harper ensured the attention of Zep heads, although there isn't much on Jugula to satisfy those craving the cock-rock wizardry of Page's early daze.

Instead, Jugula offers eight mid-tempo folk-rock numbers, performed on tinny plastic Ovation guitars and ornamented by Page's wiry Telecaster (the one with the G-string bender) and sundry synthesizers. Harper's once bracing tenor had by then become a reedy whine, giving extra acidity to his customary remonstrations of hypocritical society.

Opener "Nineteen Forty-Eightish" is classic Harper, filled with paranoid depictions of "lemmings" who "push their pens and rush in hordes of crashing stupor," and the "unrelenting drudgery" of "cops and bureaucrats." Page pierces the chintzy acoustics with irritable electric, proving that, despite a heroin addiction that robbed him of crucial motor reflexes, he was still the hippest axeman to emerge from the 1960s Brit-blues academy.

The Gilmour-penned "Hope" would've sounded better performed by faux-Floyd, while "Hangman" benefits from some crafty Page trills and irresistibly morbid lyrics. "Hangman oh hangman / How sleepless is your bed I can't believe my own ears / My heart is full of lead That you'd apply and get the job / Of pulling off my head / And leave me kicking in the darkness / Splattering the walls with blood," Harper cruelly croons.

"Advertisement (Another Intentional Irrelevant Suicide)" is a revved-up groove-rocker that features the repeating refrain, "I'm really stoned" – a declaration requiring zero suspension of disbelief. Page turns in a rousing solo, with country-inspired bends and the wafer-thin electric tone that marked many a Zep LP. If only he were backed by John Bonham's bricklayer beats, and they might've been onto something.

Comparable in sound to Harper's finest work from the previous decade, "Frozen Moment" is the record's strongest cut. Chiming, finger-picked acoustics are met a mournful vocal from Harper and tasteful embellishments by Page.

Although it may have helped Harper regain some commercial footing in a particularly avaricious era, Jugula hasn't aged well. The re-issue is a welcome goody for collectors, but neophytes would be advised to start elsewhere (see Stormcock). -Dusted Magazine
Statistics

Released:
Mar. 4, 1985

Chart Position:
#60 (US) #44 (UK)

Tracks

1. Nineteen Forty-Eightish
2. Bad Speech
3. Hope
4. Hangman
5. Elizabeth
6. Frozen Moment
7. Twentieth Century Man
8. Advertisement (Another Intentional Irrelevant Suicide)
Quick Fact

"The title for 'Jugula' came from playing Trivial Pursuit, in order to explain to everyone how they should go about answering the questions as straight and honestly as possible I'd say, 'Go for the jugula'. It was going to be 'Harper & Page' for a while, but that's like selling Jimmy's name, then it went to '1214' which is the year that the Magna Carta was signed... but that was a bit esoteric. So one day we were talking and 'jugula' came up, so I phoned the artist and they'd designed up to the 'Whatever happened to...' bit so I said leave it there and put Jugula at the end."

Death Wish II: The Original Soundtrack (1982) More Info

DEATH WISH II: THE ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK
Swan Song SS 59415 (U.S.) / SSK59415 (U.K.)
1. Who's To Blame 2:41 (Page)
Bass: Dave Paton
Drums: Dave Mattacks
Electric and Synthesized Guitar: Jimmy Page
Vocals: Chris Farlowe

2a. The Chase (I) 0:00-2:30 (Page)
Bass: Dave Paton
Drums: Dave Mattacks
Synthesizer, Electric and Synthesized Guitar: Jimmy Page

2b. The Chase (II) 2:30-4:38 (Page)
Drums: Dave Mattacks
Strings: The Sol Symphonic
Synthesizer: Jimmy Page

2c. The Chase (III) 4:38-5:52 (Page)
Bass: Dave Paton
Percussion: Dave Mattacks
Piano: Dave Lawson
Synthesizer: Jimmy Page

3. City Sirens 2:01 (Page/Edwards)
Electric and Acoustic Guitar: Jimmy Page
Bass: Dave Paton
Drums: Dave Mattacks
Vocals, Electric Piano: Gordon Edwards

4. Jam Sandwich 2:35 (Page)
Bass: Dave Paton
Drums: Dave Mattacks
Guitar: Jimmy Page

5a. Carole's Theme - Introduction 0:00-1:28 (Page)
Orchestra: GLC Philharmonic
Piano: Dave Lawson

5b. Main Theme 1:28-2:50 (Page)
Acoustic Guitar: Jimmy Page
Piano: David Sinclair Whittaker
Strings: The Sol Symphonic

6. The Release 2:35 (Page)
Bass: Dave Paton
Drums: Dave Mattacks
Electric Guitar: Jimmy Page
Orchestra: GLC Philharmonic

7a. Hotel Rats 0:00-1:00 (Page)
Orchestra: GLC Philharmonic
Synthesizer: Jimmy Page

7b. Photostats 1:00-2:40 (Page)
Bass: Dave Paton
Drums, Percussion: Dave Mattacks
Synthesizer: Jimmy Page

8. A Shadow In The City 4:01 (Page)
Bass: Dave Paton
Drums, Percussion: Dave Mattacks
Bowed, Electric and Synthesized Guitar, Synthesizer: Jimmy Page

9. Jill's Theme 4:00 (Page)
Orchestra: GLC Philharmonic

10. Prelude 2:20 (Page)
Bass: Dave Paton
Drums: Dave Mattacks
Electric Guitar: Jimmy Page
Piano: Gordon Edwards
Prophet Strings: Dave Lawson

11a. Big Band 0:00-0:17 (Page)
Synth Brass: Dave Lawson
Rhythm Guitar, Bass: Jimmy Page

11b. Sax, And Violence 0:17-2:51 (Page)
Bass: Dave Paton
Drums: Dave Mattacks
Electric Guitar: Jimmy Page
Synth Saxophone: Dave Lawson

12. Hypnotizing Ways (Oh Mamma) 2:49 (Page)
Drums: Dave Mattacks
Electric Piano: Gordon Edwards
Electric Guitar, Bass: Jimmy Page
Vocals: Chris Farlowe

Synthesizer by Roland Electronics
Engineered and mixed by Stuart Epps at the Sol Studio, Cookham
Produced by Jimmy Page

Death Wish II: The Original Soundtrack (1982)

Death Wish II: The Original Soundtrack (1982)
[Click above for album images]

DEATH WISH II: THE ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK (1982)

Though the soundtrack for Death Wish II may not sound like an interesting record on the surface, it is actually a significant release for any number of reasons. For one thing, it was the first album that Jimmy Page recorded and released after the breakup of Led Zeppelin, and the album serves as a fascinating transition from Zeppelin's final studio release, In Through The Out Door, to the work Page would do with his ill-fated supergroup The Firm. In addition to containing Page's work with a full orchestra, there are several pieces that showcase his well-established ability to create eerie, unnerving guitar and synthesizer lines, mainly to serve as accompaniment to the film. Page also delivers three fully composed rock songs, Who's to Blame, Hypnotizing Ways and City Sirens. The songs are appropriately creepy and foreboding, and his playing is just as impressive as it was in the Zeppelin era, but they also showcase the one weakness of the album, which is that Page has chosen fairly uninspired collaborators here. Drummer Dave Mattacks and bassist Dave Paton are competent enough, but neither one threatens to overshadow or even push Page (as John Paul Jones and John Bonham would have), and he turns in sometimes lackluster performances because of it. The real clincher, though, is singer Chris Farlowe, who delivers what has to be the most embarrassing ham-fisted blues singing ever heard on record, and his deep-voiced histrionics destroy whatever mood Page hoped to create with the music. (Thankfully, he ruins only two songs.) Still, though this is hardly the place for Page neophytes to begin, listeners interested in discovering a new, interesting side of him should seek this out.
Statistics

Released:
Feb. 15, 1982 (LP)
Dec. 28, 1999 (CD)

Chart Positions:
#50 (U.S.) #40 (U.K.)

Certified:


Tracks

1. Who's To Blame
2. The Chase
3. City Sirens
4. Jam Sandwich
5. Carole's Theme
6. The Release
7. Hotel Rats and Photostats
8. A Shadow In The City
9. Jill's Theme
10. Prelude
11. Big Band, Sax and Violence
12. Hypnotizing Ways (Oh Mamma)
Quick Fact

The track Prelude was based on Prelude No. 4 in E minor (Op. 28) by Frédéric Chopin.
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October xx, 1968 - Led Zeppelin is recorded
October 19, 1968 - Final performance as the New Yardbirds
October 31, 1969 - Led Zeppelin II is released in the US
October 17, 1969 - Bonham is thrilled to play Carnegie Hall where Buddy Rich and Gene Krupa have performed
October 23, 1970 - Led Zeppelin III is released in the US
October xx, 1970 - The press lash out at the band over the Led Zeppelin III acoustic content
October xx, 1971 - Page and Plant venture around Thailand and India after the Japan tour
October 18, 1972 - Zeppelin rehearse at the Rainbow Theater for a UK tour
October xx, 1973 - Each member performs an individual film sequence for their concept film
October 31, 1974 - Swan Song hosts a party for the launch of its UK division
October xx, 1975 - Led Zeppelin decide not to tour and concentrate on recording new material
October 20, 1976 - The Song Remains The Same premieres at New York’s Cinema One
October xx, 1977 - Jimmy starts assembling a Led Zeppelin live album from recordings as far back as 1969
October xx, 1978 - Jones and Bonham record with Paul McCartney at Abbey Road Studios
October xx, 1978 - Rehearsals for In Through The Out Door in London
October xx, 1979 - All nine Led Zeppelin albums enter the Billboards Top 200 -- no other band has ever achieved this
October 10, 1980 - A private funeral is held for John Bonham at Rushock church in Worcestershire
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